How To Use Essential Oils For Coughs & Colds In Children

There are lots of coughs and colds around at the moment, so I have put together this article about how to use essential oils to sooth the symptoms of coughs and colds in children.


I know that when my children were small I wanted to use natural, drug free solutions, and before I learned about aromatherapy I would not have known where to start.  So many questions – which essential oils? How many drops? Mix what with what? How to use them?  How long to keep them? Where to keep them?   So confusing!


This article is for you if you have children, or grand-children, and would like to know exactly how to use essential oils for coughs and colds – the what, when, how and where!


I want to make it easy for you, so here are easy step by step instructions using just 3 essential oils.

Step 1:  Buy the essential oils. 

First of all, make sure that the essential oils you purchase are of good quality, organic if possible, and make sure that they are pure essential oils, not fragrant oils.  Buy from a reputable supplier – your local health food store, also Neal’s Yard, Essential Oils Direct, Amphora Aromatics are a few good brands I can recommend and you can buy online.  If you live in the UK I can also supply you with essential oils, just contact me.    The 3 we are going to be using are Eucalyptus, Lavender and Tea Tree.  While shopping, buy a small glass screw top bottle to mix.

Step 2:  Blend.

Mix together 10 drops of eucalyptus, 10 drops of tea tree and 10 drops of lavender.  Keep this mixture in a small glass screw top bottle.


Step 3:  Choose Your Method:

Diffuser.

There are two main types of diffuser.  The common factor is that they have a water reservoir above and a method of warming the water below.  The classic type has a space for a nightlight candle underneath.  Modern versions are electric, some with colour change effect.  I have both types and they are equally as good.  The electric version can be a bit noisy.  If you are using them around a child or baby, you are going to have to place them somewhere out of reach, especially if you are using it in their bedroom.


The essential oils are added to the water and as the heat source warms the water the aroma is spread throughout the room.  The essential oils are then breathed in through the nose.    Note – always use tepid or cold water, not too hot, otherwise the essential oils will evaporate too quickly and you will lose the effect.


Bathing.

Adding drops of essential oil to a warm bath is very relaxing, and when you or your child are feeling under the weather it really helps, as you are inhaling the essential oils along with the steam which sooths the nasal passages, as well as getting the effect of the oils on the skin.  Ensure the bath is warm, not hot, because if it is too hot the essential oils will evaporate too quickly. It is very important to ensure you swish the essential oils around with your hand before you or your child get in because otherwise the essential oils will sit on the surface of the water and will be concentrated on the skin.  No more than 20 minutes in the bath, wrapped up in a warm towel, in their PJ’s and into a cosy bed.


Massage.

Mixing essential oils with a carrier oil such as Sweet Almond Oil or Grapeseed Oil and then applying by massage is one of the best ways to use essential oils because you have the effect of the essential oils together with the potent effect of human touch giving a very positive effect on the body and mind.  If a child had a cough or cold, then you can simply massage the oils on to their back, chest and maybe also their feet.  Very comforting and soothing, and they get the effect of the oils as they breathe in.  Great to do just before bed.


Step 3: Safety Precautions

  • Never use neat essential oils directly on the skin. There are a couple of exceptions to this rule.  Lavender can be applied undiluted to burns, cuts and insect bites.

  • Never use essential oils internally.  I know that a popular brand from the USA advocates using essentially oils internally but I would not recommend this for adults and never ever for babies or children. The IFA (International Federation of Aromatherapists) does not recommend this method of use.

  • Babies and children require much smaller amount of the oils than adults to obtain effective results. Essential oils are potent and using more definitely does not mean better results. Keep to the guidance I have given.

Step 4:  Work out how many drops depending on age of child.


For children over 12 you can also use steam inhalation if your child is congested by using 5 drops of the mix in a bowl of hot (not boiling) water, with a towel placed over head and bowl.  Always supervise.


If you have questions, would like to know more, just drop me a message, I will be pleased to help.

📷

Struggling With A Stiff Neck?

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One of the common issues that clients come to see me about is a stiff neck.  This can be really debilitating and painful, as well as being very inconvenient when you need to look behind you and find that you can’t.  This image illustrates just what I am talking about!

Two of the main causes are: poor posture; usually due to sitting in the same position for too long, such as looking at a mobile phone or a computer screen at the wrong angle, or perhaps sitting knitting or sewing with your neck in a forward position for a long period of time; or due to an injury such as a car accident or a fall.

There is usually pain in the neck when trying to turn your head, accompanied by all sorts of alarming cracking and creaking noises. If it is very severe just holding your head up straight will be painful.  If it is due to poor posture, then this can come on gradually until you become aware of an inability to turn your head when reversing or trying to look behind you. 

Sometimes the pain is not just in the neck but also in the shoulder, upper back, and possibly in one or both arms.  You may be able to move your head freely one side but not the other.  When you observe people with a stiff neck, they often have to move their entire upper body around when they want to look behind them. 

Sometimes a stiff neck clears up on its own.  It depends on the severity and the cause of the problem and so it can vary from a few days to a few weeks.   If a stiff neck lasts longer than this then you may need to seek help from your GP or a therapist. 

It isn’t commonly known that neck pain can also be caused by an issue in the jaw, and a good therapist will be able to help you with this. Pain doesn’t always originate where you can feel it.

Below I have listed some self-help techniques which you can easily do at home.

When to Seek help.  If the pain and lack of mobility continues for more than a few weeks, then it is recommended that you get yourself checked at the GP.  Red Flags. If severe neck pain commenced after an accident, then you should seek help without delay.  If your stiff neck is accompanied by nausea, fever, severe headache, vomiting then seek help immediately. Time.  Most times a stiff neck caused by poor posture will ease off by itself in a few days to a few weeks. Time may be all that is needed for the damaged tissues to heal.  Heat and Ice.  If there is pain, then you can apply a heat pad or ice pad for the first couple of days.  Experiment to see which helps the most as it varies from person to person.  Medication. You can buy over the counter medication such as ibuprofen to help provide temporary relief from the pain.  Seek the advice of your pharmacist.Support.  Advice used to be to wear a neck collar, but this is no longer recommended.  It is better to keep your neck unrestricted, and to keep it moving gently and slowly. Healing.  It is important to remember that the body is a self-healing organism and can usually heal itself without requiring any intervention.  Rest.  If the neck pain came on after a strain or injury, then the tissues are likely to have been damaged, so it is important to rest for a couple of days to allow the damaged tissues to heal. This means avoiding excessive twisting or movement of the neck such as gym, swimming, sports.  After a few days you can start to move the neck actively again. Self-Massage.  The simplest technique is to roll up a towel.  Lay down on the floor (a bed is too soft) and place the rolled up towel under your neck.  Gently roll your head from side to side making sure your head is relaxed. Exercises.  The best exercises are the simplest ones.  Do not push further than the point where you feel resistance.  Repeat each exercise several times and do at least twice daily.  If you consistently carry out these exercises regularly you will find that it helps a great deal.Turn your head from left to right slowly and carefully. Drop your chin down to your chest and then look up to the ceiling. Take your right ear to your right shoulder, and then take your left ear to your left shoulder. Therapy.  If restriction continues, a therapy such as Bowen Technique, massage, chiropractic or osteopathy will help to relax and relieve the tightness and pain, allowing for freer neck rotation.  It is important to keep doing gentle neck exercises (above) and to reconsider your postural habits.

I hope you have found this article useful.  Do contact me if you have any questions.

Who Am I?

My name is Sue Jaycock, I am a Bowen Therapist and a Massage Therapist working from my home clinic in Daventry, Northamptonshire. 

Here is a review from one of my clients who had neck pain.   You can read more here:

“I went to Sue because of a stiff & clicky neck. Her treatment was gentle, but really effective. Thoroughly recommended.” SW

However, Bowen isn’t just for back pain! It’s an amazing therapy for all sorts of musculoskeletal issues, aches and pains, stress and tension. Find out more here.

If you live in the Daventry area and you would like to know more about having a Bowen session with me, do get in touch.

Thanks for reading.

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Posted in Blog | Tagged Bowen in Daventry, Bowen Neck Pain, Bowen Technique, Bowen Technique Daventry, Bowen Therapy, Bowen Therapy Daventry, neck pain, neck pain daventry, Neck pain northamptonshire, Struggling with neck pain |

How to use essential oils for coughs and colds in children

Posted on

There are lots of coughs and colds around at the moment, so I have put together this article about how to use essential oils to sooth the symptoms of coughs and colds in children.

I know that when my children were small I wanted to use natural, drug free solutions, and before I learned about aromatherapy I would not have known where to start.  So many questions – which essential oils? How many drops? Mix what with what? How to use them?  How long to keep them? Where to keep them?   So confusing!

This article is for you if you have children, or grand-children, and would like to know exactly how to use essential oils for coughs and colds – the what, when, how and where!

I want to make it easy for you, so here are easy step by step instructions using just 3 essential oils.


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Tel: 0771 563 4767

Bragborough Hall Health & Wellbeing Centre,

Welton Road, Braunston, Near Daventry, Northants NN11 7JG

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